Breastfed children are less likely to develop type 1 diabetes but those who drink a lot of cow’s milk are at greater risk, a study suggests

Breastfed children are less likely to develop type 1 diabetes but those who drink a lot of cow’s milk are at greater risk, a study suggests.

An early diet of fruit or gluten – in the likes of cereal, bread and pasta – can also heighten their odds of disease, researchers warn.

Scientists reviewed 152 previous papers that examined how 27 dietary factors affected the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

This includes foods eaten by the mother in pregnancy, foods consumed in infancy and childhood, and the impact of breastfeeding.

In type 1 diabetes the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, preventing the body from making enough of the hormone to regulate blood sugar levels.

Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage the heart, eyes, feet and kidneys and can shorten life expectancy.

Scientists reviewed 152 previous papers that examined how 27 dietary factors affected the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This includes foods eaten by the mother in pregnancy, foods consumed in infancy and childhood, and the impact of breastfeeding

Scientists reviewed 152 previous papers that examined how 27 dietary factors affected the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.This includes foods eaten by the mother in pregnancy, foods consumed in infancy and childhood, and the impact of breastfeeding

What triggers the attack is unknown but is thought to involve a combination of a genetic predisposition and an environmental trigger such as a virus or food.

The number of diagnoses in young people is rising by an estimated 3.4 per cent each year.

The new analysis, presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, suggests babies that are breastfed for longer and those that are breastfed exclusively are less likely to develop the disease.

Those breastfed for at least six to 12 months were 61 per cent less likely to suffer than those breastfed for a shorter period.

And those given only breast milk for the first two to three months were 31 per cent less likely to develop the condition than those who were not exclusively breastfed.

The researchers, from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, say breastfeeding promotes the maturation of baby’s immune system and enhances their gut bacteria.

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS health" data-version="2" id="mol-35792a60-206d-11ec-a5e6-0f8a6a45d4d8" website babies could help reduce Type-1 diabetes

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